When Churches Choose Faith Over Fear

Fundamentally, the church should be a community of people in whom the Spirit of Christ is alive and well. Where the Spirit of Christ is present, certain things should start to occur. There are some general guiding ideas here in Scripture. For example, Paul says:
“For God gave us a spirit, not of fear, but of power and love and self-control.” – 2 Timothy 1:7

And:

“But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control; against such things there is no law.” – Galatians 5:22-23

John says:

“There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear. For fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not been perfected in love.” – I John 4:18
Jesus says:
“But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you.” – John 14:25-26
Many churches get their minds too caught up in the world’s methods and options and will live out of fear, rather than faith. Contrary to this, strong churches will act from the hope and courage that result where the Spirit of Christ is present. In light of these and other concepts, here are some ways we can imagine the contrasts between a fearful church and a healthy church.
  • Fearful churches feel threatened by people who ask questions and will look to silence them. Healthy churches welcome honest questions and aren’t afraid to patiently examine and re-examine their beliefs and practices in light of Scripture, especially with those who are young in the faith. Those who are really on the side of truth don’t have to be afraid of questions, because the truth should withstand hard questions.
  • Fearful churches use Scripture mostly as a weapon, and as a method for fault-finding.
    Healthy churches turn to Scripture as a source of life, allowing it to spark their imaginations for what sort of world God imagines. If we were to really trust that these words are from God, what is God calling us to do more? What does God invite us to see differently?
  • Fearful churches focus on institutional survival. They don’t take risks, don’t rock the boat, and don’t try anything that could possibly result in failure. As a result, they do very little other than fret about declining numbers.
    Healthy churches focus on God’s mission; to seek and save the lost, redeeming all that is broken within the world. They are willing to experience occasional failure in the pursuit of faithfulness and carrying out the great commission. They don’t seek conflict or frustrations, but accept them as a necessary part of growing, because growth can’t occur without change. Likewise, while numbers are a part of a church’s life and health, they understand that numbers don’t tell the whole story about what God might be doing.
  • Fearful churches stay divided into interest groups; all of whom are suspicious of each other. Most people barely know each other. They may even turn people away if they aren’t “our type.”
    Healthy churches promote friendship between groups and between generations, acknowledging that we all need each other, and are better off for the perspectives we gain from those different from ourselves. They know each other well enough, both to mourn and to celebrate as life unfolds together.
  • Fearful churches have a large distance between those with power and those without. Those with power cling to it tightly.
    Healthy churches use power to empower. Those with power use it primarily to create space and opportunities for others to use their gifts for honoring God in a variety of ways. They are always looking to create new leaders, open to creative ministries, and inviting ownership in the life and future of the church.
  • Fearful churches are irrelevant to their community. They spend most of their time thinking and talking about themselves, and seldom think outside of the brick box in which they meet.
    Healthy churches are a blessing to their community. Were they to suddenly go away, the community would lament their loss, because they had been like salt and light, making the community better and brighter.
  • Fearful churches chase after trends. When they hear rumor of a big church’s technique, they uncritically try to force that mold on their own situation, hoping it will provide a magic solution to church growth.
    Healthy churches are interested and aware of how God is at work in a variety of other Christian communities but are not afraid to grow in ways specific to their own setting. Rather than chasing trends, they build on their strengths, taking the time to know what it is that they as a community love to do and share.

No church is perfect, but when we seek God diligently and serve God joyfully, there will be evidence of Who lives among us and works through us.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.